November / December 2019 EM 6
Country profile: Turkey, Latvia, North Macedonia
Events: Fish International, International Conference on endangered species, Conxemar
Aquaculture:
Concerns about aquaculture are often unfounded
Fisheries: Opportunities for fisheries as the Arctic ice melts - International control is essential
Guest pages: Jan Kappel, European Anglers Alliance: Forging common ground among recreational fishers across Europe - Fighting in support of healthy fish stocks

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

September / October 2019 EM 5
Country profile: Albania, Denmark
Events: Seafood Expo Russia, International Carp Conference, International Arctic Forum
Aquaculture: Increasing demand for fish welfare
Fisheries: Reconciling fisheries management and conservation with MPAs, Unique co-management system contributes to
preserving small-scale fishery communities
Guest pages: Dr Bernardo Basurco, The Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Zaragoza - Education and training for sustainable fisheries

 

 

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July / August 2019 EM 4
Country profile: Lithuania, Georgia
Events: DanFish, Polfish, International Arctic Forum
Aquaculture: Shaping a vision for European aquaculture development
Technology: Big data and artificial intelligence in the fisheries and aquaculture sector
Guest pages: Brian Thomsen, Organisation of Danish Aquaculture - Forging common ground can be a challenge

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues
Thursday, 08 August 2019 08:50

Danish trade with the UK post Brexit

Should Brexit come to pass, Danish fishermen might find themselves in a tricky situation. If Britain leaves the EU and Denmark loses access to British waters the Danish fishing fleet will lose 30 percent, or about 1 billion Kroner, of total annual income, according to a report from the Department of food and Resource Economics at the University of Copenhagen.  Brexit could have the most negative impact on larger fishing corporations, which would end up losing 61 percent of total income. The Danish government is working towards a scenario in which the Danish fishing fleet will have access to British waters even if the UK leaves the EU. A recent deal between the Faroe Islands and the UK may set a positive president for trade relations between the UK and the rest of Europe in a post Brexit EU.

Published in Latest News

CEM3 19 TM Russia consumption DSC 9060onsumer survey yields vital insights in consumer habits

The second Global Fishery Forum, which was held on 13-15 September 2018 in St. Petersburg, Russia, offered an extensive programme covering various emerging topics from global fishing activities and projections for 2050, development of aquaculture, global consumer markets, technologies, and popularisation of Russian fish products.

During the second day of the Global Fishery Forum, the conference “Russian fish: a strategy for promoting Russian fish on the Russian market”, gathered experts for discussion on how to increase fish consumption. The main questions looked at understanding what Russian consumers eat and what producers are offering them, consumer awareness and the role of mass-media in this process, what can be done to stimulate consumer demand on the market, and opportunities for retail chains to increase consumption of fisheries products in the country.   

Herring is the most-consumed fish in Russia

In 2016, consumption of fish and seafood products in Russia was at 21.1 kg per capita (live weight equivalent), according to the research carried out by the All-Russian Association of Fish Breeders, Entrepreneurs and Exporters (VARPE). The market size was estimated at more than 3 million tonnes of fisheries products. Herring was the leading species with 2.81 kg per capita consumption, followed by salmon species (2.73 kg per capita), Alaska pollock (2.59 kg per capita), cod (2 kg per capita) and mackerel (1.9 kg per capita). These 5 top species make up 12 kg per capita or more than 56% of all fish and seafood products in the country. Consumption of squid, shrimp and crab was about 0.6, 0.25 and 0.14 kg per capita respectively, representing about 5% of the total fish and seafood consumption in the country. 

Published in Trade and Markets

EM3 19 TM direct sales Abb. 13Convincing benefits for suppliers and buyers

A lot of primary food producers try to sell part of their products directly to consumers and thereby circumvent other forms of trade. What has long been common practice for agricultural products is now becoming increasingly popular for fish and seafood, too. This marketing principle has advantages for both parties: the producers get better prices and the customers get optimal freshness.

When at around 4 p.m. the "petits bateaux" return to the port of Le Guilvinec on the French Atlantic coast and the fishermen unload their freshly caught fish or langoustines they are already eagerly awaited at the quayside by locals, restaurant operators and tourists. Fish that is not snapped up immediately can be seen shortly afterwards in one of the harbour fish shops, for example "La Marée du Jour", where crowds of customers are also already waiting. Three and a half hours further north-east by car in Cancale a good half dozen colourful stalls have been set up next to the town’s beach. That is where local oyster farmers offer their specialities. It would be hard to get "creuses de Cancale" fresher, or for that matter at a lower price, than here. Fresh fish sales straight from the fishing boat are also popular along the German Baltic coast. Anyone who wants to buy freshly caught cod or herring directly from the fisherman in the harbour of Wismar has to be an early riser: the town’s remaining fishermen usually land their day’s catch around breakfast time. And a lot of German trout producers, too, sell their fish directly to their customers. This sales channel is in the meantime practically indispensable from an economic point of view. Almost all producers offer their products in farm shops or at weekly markets, both fresh and processed – mainly hot smoked. Some trout farmers even have their own snack stands or fish restaurants. Direct sales are more lucrative than supplying to wholesalers and retailers. And they enable even smaller enterprises with relatively low production volumes to stay in business.

Published in Trade and Markets

Remaining agile in a dynamic marketplace

The Internet offers fishermen and retail shops ways to sell their catches that were unheard of a decade ago. Young (and older) consumers have quickly understood the benefits of online shopping, and vendors must keep pace with the latest, continually changing developments. 

Sellers enjoy superior visibility, allowing smaller concerns to compete with larger businesses, with 24/7 exposure to a wider national, even global, audience. They also benefit from enhanced business management. By tracking data about customer purchases, sellers learn their customers’ preferences and are able to target those groups with specific offers. An Internet presence allows businesses to remain agile in a dynamic marketplace.

Two businesses, while maintaining their physical stores in Vigo, Spain, have embraced the new technology. La Pescadería de mi Barrio (My Neighbourhood Fishmonger) is a business-to-business (B2B) concern. Delmaralplato is both B2B and business to customer, selling to restaurants and consumers.

Published in Trade and Markets

May / June 2019 EM 3
Country profile: Estonia, Serbia
Events: Aqua Nor - A packed programme of events
Aquaculture: New solutions to support sustainable growth in aquculture - Omega 3 fatty acids from mikroalgae instead of fish oil
Trade and Markets: Russia seeks to promote domestic fish consumption
Guest pages: Yordan Gospodnov, Black Sea Advisory Council - Forging common ground can be a challenge

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

March / April 2019 EM 2
Country profile: Romania, Montenegro
Events: National pavillions at Seafood Expo Global (SEG), Aquafarm, Marel Salmon ShowHow
Aquaculture: Lucrative fish species from aquaculture broaden the offer - Hiramasa and Black Sea salmon
Research: Will in vitro cell cultures revolutionize fish supply? - Fish cakes and sashimi from the test-tube
Guest pages: Marco Gilmozzi, Federation of European Aquaculture Producers has a new president - Solving the challenges facing European aquaculture

 

Published in Magazine Issues

January / February 2019 EM 1
Country profile: Hungary, Poland
Environment: Coastal wetlands are highly effective carbon sinks - "Blue carbon" slows down the global greenhouse effect
Aquaculture: FIAP sells a wide range of equipment for the aquaculture industry - A one-stop shop for fish farmers
Trade and Markets: Web portal offers information on aquaculture producers
Guest pages: Luisa Alvarez Blanco, FEDEPESCA - Giving traditional fish retailers a voice

 

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