May / June 2019 EM 3
Country profile: Estonia, Serbia
Events: Aqua Nor - A packed programme of events
Aquaculture: New solutions to support sustainable growth in aquculture - Omega 3 fatty acids from mikroalgae instead of fish oil
Trade and Markets: Russia seeks to promote domestic fish consumption
Guest pages: Yordan Gospodnov, Black Sea Advisory Council - Forging common ground can be a challenge

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

EM2 19 News Int dsc 0364 1To date no record of microplastics has been discovered in marine farmed fish. However, media attention on this issue grows exponentially and has a direct impact on consumers purchasing seafood products. The reality is, however, that similar problems affect terrestrial farming. APROMAR is leading a project, ACUIPLAS, that will analyse the possible problems caused by the contamination by plastic waste in three aquaculture species; seabream, sea bass, and turbot, to rule out the presence of microplastics in them. In addition, the project will perform water and feed analyses. The project started with a bibliographic study of contamination by plastic waste and associated toxic substances to identify possible direct and indirect incidences of plastics in marine aquaculture products and especially, in growing species in protected Natura 2000 areas. This work is in its development phase after which sampling and analytics will be carried out using infrared spectroscopy. The results obtained will lead to the identification of strategic measures and a set of good practices to minimize incidences of plastic waste which will be applied throughout the aquaculture sector in Spain. This project is developed in collaboration with CTAQUA, the Biodiversity Foundation, and the Ministry for Environment, and is co-financed by the EMFF. Preliminary results will be presented in October.

Published in Latest News

EM2 19 News Int FEAPThe Federation of European Aquaculture Producers (FEAP) celebrated its 50th anniversary on 29 November 2018 with an event entitled “We are the Solution” in Brussels. FEAP represents a profession producing over 20 species of fish including salmon, trout, seabass, seabream etc.  The conference traced the evolution of aquaculture and FEAP’s role over the past 50 years and, more importantly, focused on the future development of the sector. Technology has already enabled almost unthinkable advances in efficiency, particularly in countries like Norway. Where six people produced 180 tonnes of farmed fish in 1986, in 2015 four workers produced 12,000 tonnes. Technology also makes it possible to farm in more exposed areas and to higher standards of fish welfare, and with fewer environmental impacts. It will also help in combating the problems of escapes and sea lice (in case of salmon). Technology is, however, only one of the inputs into the sector. Fish feeds, another vital factor, will continue to evolve, containing less fishmeal and fish oil and depending more on novel raw materials that will positively impact feed efficiencies and the health and welfare of fish. It is these developments and other that will make it possible to produce the estimated 30m tonnes of fish needed to feed the global population in 2050 in the face of stable catches of wild fish. Competing visions for the industry were also aired at the event with one speaker emphasising the importance of low impact fish farming using an ecosystem-based model that captured and reused nutrients to prevent environmental degradation and to change the negative perception of aquaculture prevalent among parts of the public. Building a positive image of the industry as well as creating an awareness of the health benefits of fish are the goals of the Farmed in the EU campaign. At least two countries, Lithuania and Ireland, have started programmes with school children to inform them about the socioeconomic, nutritional, and environmental role of European aquaculture. Giving future generations the wherewithal to make informed decisions about the aquaculture sector will contribute to a competitive and dynamic industry in the future, as envisioned by FEAP.

Published in Latest News

EM2 2019Eurofish Magazine issue 2 2019 features the fishing and aquaculture sectors in Romania and Montenegro. The Aquaculture section looks at Hiramasa and Black Sea Salmon as lucrative fish species for aquaculture. And in the research section we look at whether the in vitro cell cultures will revolutionize fish supply?

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

March / April 2019 EM 2
Country profile: Romania, Montenegro
Events: National pavillions at Seafood Expo Global (SEG), Aquafarm, Marel Salmon ShowHow
Aquaculture: Lucrative fish species from aquaculture broaden the offer - Hiramasa and Black Sea salmon
Research: Will in vitro cell cultures revolutionize fish supply? - Fish cakes and sashimi from the test-tube
Guest pages: Marco Gilmozzi, Federation of European Aquaculture Producers has a new president - Solving the challenges facing European aquaculture

 

Published in Magazine Issues

GlobalG.A.P. is one of the world’s most important certification standards for food safety. Initially, it acted as a business-to-business standard, attesting that the products of certified suppliers were safe and their production sustainable. In the meantime, however, GlobalG.A.P. is increasingly becoming a business-to-consumer standard.

Published in Trade and Markets

EM1 2019Eurofish Magazine issue 1 2019 features the fishing and aquaculture sectors in Hungary and Poland. The environment section looks at coastal wetlands as highly effective carbon sinks and how “Blue carbon” slows down the global greenhouse effect.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

January / February 2019 EM 1
Country profile: Hungary, Poland
Environment: Coastal wetlands are highly effective carbon sinks - "Blue carbon" slows down the global greenhouse effect
Aquaculture: FIAP sells a wide range of equipment for the aquaculture industry - A one-stop shop for fish farmers
Trade and Markets: Web portal offers information on aquaculture producers
Guest pages: Luisa Alvarez Blanco, FEDEPESCA - Giving traditional fish retailers a voice

 

Published in Magazine Issues

This article featured in Eurofish Magazine 6 2018.

EM6 18 AQ Global Fishery Forum 2018St. Petersburg, the “Venice of the North”, hosted the second edition of the Global Fishery Forum and Seafood Expo Russia on 13-15 September 2018. The event centered on what to expect from the global fisheries industry and markets in the coming decades.
The forum brought together more than 1 100 business leaders, members of international food and fisheries organizations, specialized ministries, international seafood companies and fisheries representatives from 42 countries, including Canada, China, Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Morocco, Norway, and Turkey.

 

Asia strongly represented at aquaculture session

The session “Aquaculture production and development forecast by 2050” focused on the discussions of the state of the global aquaculture sector, its future growth, and environmental control and safety. Moderated by Ekaterina Tribilustova, Eurofish International Organisation, the session hosted experts from specialized agencies, ministries, sectorial organisations and unions from 8 countries, including the Federal Agency for Fisheries of Russia, the Union of Sturgeon Breeders of Russia, China’s Union of Seafood Processing Enterprises, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry of Turkey, the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Islamic Republic of Iran and Shilat Organization for Fisheries and Fish Farming of Iran, and the National Institute of Research and Development of fisheries sector in the Republic of Korea.
At present, the aquaculture industry produces over 45% of fish and seafood products consumed globally, while the share of fish products is 53%, according to the FAO. At the same time, the global population has never consumed as much fish as now. Since 1961, the growth rates of fish consumption in the world have been two times higher than the population growth, while the production growth rates have been declining. It is expected that even growing at a slower rate the aquaculture sector can eliminate the gap between growing demand and declining resources playing a major role in providing the world population with the proteins they need. The aquaculture sector in particular has an especially important role in improving food nutrition and fighting hunger.

Published in Aquaculture

This article featured in Eurofish Magazine 6 2018.

EM6 18 AQ aquacultureDemand for fish and seafood products is growing throughout the world. Although catches from the fishing sector have stagnated since the 1990s per capita supply worldwide has increased. This is mainly due to global aquaculture which is growing year by year at impressive rates of between 6 and 8 per cent. In spite of this, fish farming is still criticised and its image is in many places far from good.

Without aquaculture it would not be possible to maintain today’s level of fish and seafood supply to mankind. Despite improved sustainability the quantity of fish landed cannot be increased at will, especially since the effects of regional overfishing, natural stock fluctuations, and climate change are difficult to calculate. With the targeted production of fish and seafood humanity has found a way out of this dilemma rendering aquaculture a logical step that has long been common and "normal" in other areas of food production such as fruit, vegetables and meat. We are all well aware of the fact that these products are not collected from the wild but are systematically grown or bred and produced by mankind according to his needs. Although agricultural production has a “head start” of hundreds of years, aquaculture is rapidly catching up, with its production capacity growing worldwide by 3 to 4 million tonnes a year. In the last decade alone it almost doubled. If this growth continues aquaculture could be on a level with traditional fishing by the beginning of the next decade.

There is a lot to be said for aquaculture. For example the fact that most of the production and spectacular growth rates are achieved in Asia and South America, thereby strengthening the economies of developing countries. Aquaculture has become an important source of income, providing welcome – and valuable – export goods. Low resource and feed requirements also clearly speak in favour of aquaculture. In the case of salmon only 1.3 kg of feed is needed for the fish to grow by one kilogram, whereas poultry need 2 kg and pigs 2.9 kg of feed. And measured in terms of land use per kilogram of protein produced, aquaculture performs better, too. Depending on farming intensity, 160 to 2,100 square metres of land area per kilogram of protein produced are required for cattle farming, whereas fish in aquaculture are presumed to require less than 25 square metres. And even when we look at nutrient emissions that contribute to the eutrophication of water bodies, aquaculture often scores better than people think, as the following table shows.

 

Published in Aquaculture
Page 3 of 5