Displaying items by tag: fisheries

January / February 2019 EM 1
Country profile: Hungary, Poland
Environment: Coastal wetlands are highly effective carbon sinks - "Blue carbon" slows down the global greenhouse effect
Aquaculture: FIAP sells a wide range of equipment for the aquaculture industry - A one-stop shop for fish farmers
Trade and Markets: Web portal offers information on aquaculture producers
Guest pages: Luisa Alvarez Blanco, FEDEPESCA - Giving traditional fish retailers a voice

 

Published in Magazine Issues

EM1 19 News Int WWF IMG 0992In December 2018 in Zagreb, Croatia, the World Wildlife Foundation (WWF) Adria organized a roundtable discussion “Who is responsible for responsible fisheries”. The aim of the roundtable was to foster dialogue among the key national and international stakeholders responsible for fisheries in Adriatic, and to identify the actual and potential issues together with its solutions. “Fish stocks in the Mediterranean Sea are deteriorating at an alarming rate, and the Adriatic Sea is no exception. Open dialogue with all the sector’s stakeholders is key to the recovery of our resources and fisheries industry in Croatia. The mission of WWF is to facilitate effective cooperation among fishermen, administration and scientists,” stated Danijel Kanski, Marine Program Manager at WWF Adria in his opening remarks at the event.

The event gathered 40 participants from fisheries sector including fishermen, representatives of FLAGs, producer organisations, processors, international organisations, Croatian Chamber of Economy (HGK), NGOs and Ministry of Agriculture. During a panel moderated by Lav Bavcevic, University of Zadar, seven panellists presented their views on current issues and steps needed for resolving them ensuring sustainable fisheries in the Adriatic.

Published in Latest News
Thursday, 13 December 2018 09:47

Eurofish Magazine Issue 6 2018 (November / December)

November / December 2018 EM 6
Country profile: Croatia, Romania
Technology: Growing concern about plastic waste in the oceans - Search for plastic-free packaging intensified
Aquaculture: Aquaculture has a poor image despite immense economic importance - Lack of knowledge nourishes prejudices
Species: Will eel soon be off the menu? - Europe struggling to save the eel population

 

Published in Magazine Issues

September / October 2018 EM 5
Country profile: Latvia
Technology: Industry 4.0 conquers the fish processing sector - Automated processing lines take over from traditional manual work
Aquaculture: Algae and aquatic plants in global aquaculture
Events: Tuna 2018, WTO, Market Access. and Fish Trade

 

Published in Magazine Issues

Danube Conference2018The FAO, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development in Romania, EUROFISH, DSTF, and EIFAAC are arranging a conference in Bucharest, Romania on 13-15 November titled Regional Conference on River habitat restoration for inland fisheries in the Danube River basin and adjacent Black Sea areas. The event will hold sessions on valuing inland fisheries resources, conservation and management, regulatory framework, along with shared country experiences from the region. The event will not only attract participants from the involved countries but is also expected to be visited with representatives from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan. Speakers and programme information is available at danube-conference.eurofish.dk

Published in Latest News

July / August 2018 EM 4
Country profiles: Spain and Romania
Fisheries: Chronic shortage of young people for Europe’s fishing industry - Less and less interest in joining the fishing profession
Aquaculture: Drones and robots for more efficiency in aquaculture - Offshore aquaculture requires intelligent technologies
Events: Review of the SEG show in Brussels

 

Published in Magazine Issues
Wednesday, 27 June 2018 10:14

Eurofish Magazine Issue 3 2018 (May / June)

May / June 2018 EM 3
Country profiles: Norway, Estonia, Slovenia
Fisheries: Multi-species models, more selective nets and more efficient fishing vessels
Aquaculture: Urban fish farming: A realistic model or unworldly utopia?
Events: Review of the SEG show in Brussels

 

Published in Magazine Issues

EM2 18 FISH IUU1Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU fishing for short) is one of the greatest threats to the sustainability of fishing, marine ecosystems, marine biodiversity, and human food security. Although international bodies and the UN regard illegal fishing as an environmental crime and the European Union has adopted a regulation to combat IUU fishing the problem has not been fully resolved because there are still gaps and loopholes.

Illegal, undocumented and unregulated fishing, also known as pirate fishing, has many facets. In deep-sea fishing, it is understood to mean all types of commercial fishing carried out without the necessary licence, in which the fishing quota authorised under the fishing licence is exceeded, or in which the quantities caught are not, not completely or incorrectly documented. However, it is also considered to be IUU fishing if a fishing vessel fishes in territorial waters of other nations without permission, or if it violates the fishing laws of that country, for example by ignoring fishing times and protected areas. The territorial waters of some West African countries, for example, are among the preferred fishing areas for pirate fishing. In none of these countries is there a strong fisheries control authority, so that the pirate vessels are not in much danger of being caught.

Published in Fisheries
Wednesday, 04 April 2018 10:01

Eurofish Magazine Issue 2 2018 (March / April)

March / April 2018 EM 2
Country profile: Poland, Lithuania
Fisheries: IIUU fishing torpedoes sustainable fisheries management - When licensed fishing and adherence to quotas is penalized
Aquaculture: Insurance – Is it worth it? Coverage of operational risks linked to strict conditions
Events: Preview of the SEG show in Brussels

Published in Magazine Issues
Tuesday, 27 February 2018 15:25

Big data reveals global fishing footprint

EM2 18 News Int FishFootprintEven though fishing activities have been monitored for selected fleets using electronic vessel monitoring systems, logbooks, and onboard observers, these efforts only provide very limited evidence of a region’s fishing patterns. A new study published by Science Magazine has made use of global satellite-based observations along with artificial intelligence to train and analyse the 22 billion messages publicly broadcast from marine vessels’ automatic identification system (AIS) from 2012 to 2016. The particularity of movements relating to fishing have led to the identification of more than 70,000 fishing vessels ranging from 6 to 146 m in length, with a 95% accuracy. The movements of these commercial fishing vessels have been tracked hourly and reveal a global ‘heat map’ that covers more than 55% of the ocean’s surface or over four times the area covered by agriculture.

Although the data set includes only a limited proportion of the world’s estimated 2.9 million motorized fishing vessels, it encompasses most of the larger vessels exceeding 24m in length and is estimated to account for between 50 to 70% of the total high seas fishing.

Over the course of 2016, the data set captured 40 million hours of fishing activity by these vessels covering a combined distance of more than 460 million km, the equivalent of traveling to the moon and back 600 times, and consuming 19 billion kWh of energy.

Published in Latest News
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