Displaying items by tag: fisheries

EM3 20 FISH auctions1Competition for fish is becoming increasingly international

This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 3 2020.

The basic idea behind auctions is very old: the goods on offer will be sold to the highest bidder. This method – which is also used to auction fish and seafood – is as simple as it is successful. But the advancement of digital technologies is now making its mark in this area. Many auctions have completed the step into the modern age and are using the possibilities of the internet to prepare themselves for the global fish business.

In many regions of the world it is common practice for fishermen to sell what they catch to just one or only a few wholesalers. This can work, but it has the disadvantage that the fishermen are dependent on the trader and are sometimes not paid fairly because the trader dictates the prices. That is why quite a lot of fishermen consider auctions to be the better method for first hand sale in the fish marketing chain. The principle of auctioning fish catches and selling to the highest bidder is not new and has in some places proven itself for decades. The bell that heralded the opening of the daily fish auction in Honolulu rang for the first time in 1952, and the Tsukiji fish market which closed down just recently in Tokyo, where it counted 900 licensed traders who handled around 1,600 tonnes of fish and seafood a day, was opened as early as 1935. The roots of the Norwegian Sildesalgslag go back to 1927, and Sweden’s largest fish auction in the port of Gothenburg even dates back to 1910. The idea of bringing together suppliers and potential buyers for trading certain goods such as fish and seafood under regulated conditions offers several advantages from which fishermen, traders and ultimately consumers all benefit equally because a constant supply of fresh produce is guaranteed every day.

Published in Fisheries

EM3 20 HRCroatia steers Presidency of the EU Council despite coronavirus

This article featured in EM 3 2020.

Holding the rotating Presidency of the Council of the European Union is a challenging task at the best of times. Despite being a small country, holding the Presidency for the first time, and facing a Europe-wide health and economic crisis, Croatia intends to make progress on key fisheries and aquaculture issues on its agenda, says Ante Misura, Assistant Minister with responsibility for fisheries in the Ministry of Agriculture.

Since the 1st of January, Croatia has taken over the Presidency of the Council of the European Union. What are the main priorities for the fisheries sector on the agenda during the 6-month presidency, and are they going to be achieved, given the current Covid-19 crisis?

This is our first Presidency since becoming an EU Member State. It came at a time of many changes, with the new Commission and Parliament on board, and with the UK leaving the EU family. The Presidency often faces unplanned situations, but the Covid-19 crisis is without precedent in recent history. From a practical point of view, meetings at the Council could no longer take place as planned, and it has therefore been difficult to make progress within our 6-month term. In light of the crisis, our priority was to find a way to help the fishery and aquaculture sector to better cope with the consequences of the pandemic. In close cooperation with the Commission and the Parliament, we managed to adopt urgent new measures that will support fishermen, aquaculture farmers and processors. However, our main priorities have remained the same, and are related to two important subjects. First are the negotiations on the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund for the 2021-2027 programming period. We aim to achieve as much progress as possible in inter-institutional negotiations, and have found a way to continue working with the Commission and the Parliament in these challenging times. Our second priority is to make significant progress on the new fisheries control regulation, and we believe we will achieve it by the end of our Presidency. Our goal is to reach a Partial General Approach in June, as planned.

Published in Croatia

EM3 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 3 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Croatia, Albania and Kazakhstan. The Species section looks at Octopus.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator
Monday, 22 June 2020 11:45

Eurofish Magazine Issue 3 2020 (May / June)

May / June 2020 EM 3
Country profile: Croatia, Albania, Kazakhstan
Events: Icefish
Trade and Markets:
Corona pandemic changes markets and consumer behaviour - Globalisation will remain an indispensable part of the fish industry
Technology: Fishing methods influence the sustainability of fisheries - More selective fishing protects stocks and marine ecosystems
Guest pages: Maja Markovcic Kostelac - EMSA strengthens Europe’s competitiveness, sustainable growth, and the blue economy - Contributing to all EU policy areas related to the sea

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues
Thursday, 16 April 2020 08:57

The seafood sector in Saudi Arabia

 EM 2 20 Saudi Arabia aquacultureA vision for growth is being realised

This article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is famous for its vast oil reserves, a quarter of the world’s total, and for the dominance of its economy by petroleum and associated industries. However, growing diversification of the Saudi economy has benefited some sectors. In agriculture the Kingdom is now self-sufficient in the production of milk, eggs, wheat, and other commodities. In addition, the country is a major exporter of fruits, vegetables, dairy products and fish and seafood to markets around the world.

Published in Saudi Arabia

EM 2 20 Alicia Villauriz IglesiasThis article featured in EUROFISH Magazine 2 2020.
Dña. Alicia Villauriz Iglesias, the Secretary General for Fisheries, has a long history at top levels of the administration of the Spanish agriculture, fisheries, and food sectors with experience both from within Spain and outside. She outlines here some of the issues facing the Spanish fisheries sector and the measures her administration is taking to address them.

Published in Spain

EM2 2020Eurofish Magazine issue 2 2020 features the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in Spain, Estonia and Saudi Arabia. The Aquaculture section looks using less fishmeal in aquafeed.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator
Tuesday, 07 April 2020 07:30

Eurofish Magazine Issue 2 2020 (March / April)

March / April 2020 EM 2
Country profile: Spain, Estonia, Saudi Arabia
Events: Fish International, Salmon ShowHow
Aquaculture:
Importance of fishmeal for aquafeed continues to decline - More and more vegetable feed components are being used
Technology: Reduce plastics and waste with sustainable labelling and banding
Guest pages: Dr Manuel Barange - Climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems are modulated by other forcing factors - Reducing overall stress boosts resilience to climate change

 

 

Published in Magazine Issues

FAO Policy Brief COVID 19As with other sectors of the global economy, fisheries and aquaculture are also being affected by the spread of COVID-19. Producers, processors, traders, and consumers are both directly and indirectly feeling the impact of the virus, the consequences of which, particularly for populations that depend heavily on seafood for food security and nutrition, can be severe. FAO has therefore released a brief on how COVID-19 is affecting the fisheries and aquaculture sector and suggested measures to support the different players in the supply chain. Production, for instance, may suffer from the imposition of sanitary measures on board that make fishing difficult, crews may not be able to join their vessels due to travel restrictions, and the necessary supplies of bait or ice may not be available. In addition, demand in some countries has fallen as a result of unfounded perceptions about links between COVID-19 and seafood. Aquaculture production is affected by the closure of markets, the shutdown of the HORECA sector, and restrictions on flights and cargo movements. In the processing sector issues with cross border transport, uncertain supply of raw materials, and market restriction are among the challenges companies must face. COVID-19 is also likely to have an impact on fisheries management and policy as stock assessments, fisheries observer programmes, and science and management meetings may all be postponed or cancelled. Measures to support the different elements in the supply chain extend from expanding government purchases of seafood to maintain demand and prevent a slump in prices to extending credit and microfinance facilities to fish farmers to ensuring smooth passage of goods at ports, rail terminals, and at border crossings. The complete brief is available at http://www.fao.org/documents/card/en/c/ca8637en

Published in Latest News
Friday, 03 April 2020 14:59

Implications of the COVID-19 pandemic

CoronaThe COVID-19 pandemic continues to have profound implications, shaping global demand and altering the supply patterns of many industries, not least the fisheries and aquaculture sector.
Fish and fish products need to move across borders with no restrictions, while in compliance with the existing measures to protect consumers’ health.


In order to assist the sector, GLOBEFISH will soon start disseminating a periodical newsletter covering past, current and future impacts of the pandemic on fisheries and aquaculture through the contribution of multiple participants in the value chain in different parts of the world.


In this regard, GLOBEFISH would greatly appreciate external input by responding to a short questionnaire.

The information collected will form a key basis for assessment and enable the industry to better access current information. Please note that all answers will be treated confidentially, and data will only be reported at aggregate levels.


The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is continuously monitoring and sharing information on the COVID-19, particularly possible disruptions in the food supply chain and challenges in terms of logistics. GLOBEFISH is part of the Fisheries and Aquaculture Department of FAO, responsible for providing up-to-date market and trade information on fish and fish products.

Published in Frontpage rotator
Page 2 of 7