News Int Extra italian sculptorThe Italian Embassy and the Italian Cultural Institute in Copenhagen invited the Italian artist and environmental advocate Massimo Catalani to present his work and its contribution to marine protection. The presentation was held at the National Aquarium Denmark – Den Blå Planet, and was introduced by Luigi Ferrari, the Italian ambassador to Denmark.

Along the coast of Tuscany illegal bottom trawling was destroying the seabed. To counter this, a decision to submerge 10-tonne concrete blocks was made by the local community. These blocks, would destroy nets and gear and at the same time provide an ecosystem for fish and other organisms to thrive. Massimo Catalani began sculpturing huge granite blocks instead of the concrete ones to raise awareness of the environmental impact we humans have on nature and at the same time to “give something beautiful back to the sea.” His massive sculptures contain depictions of fish and other sea creatures and are painted with a special glow-in-the-dark paint and have drawn attention to bottom trawling in Italy and beyond. He and other artists are now looking for funding to continue the work and contributions can be made to www.casadeipesci.it

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EM1 2019Eurofish Magazine issue 1 2019 features the fishing and aquaculture sectors in Hungary and Poland. The environment section looks at coastal wetlands as highly effective carbon sinks and how “Blue carbon” slows down the global greenhouse effect.

Click here to read the latest issue of the magazine.
 

Published in Frontpage rotator

January / February 2019 EM 1
Country profile: Hungary, Poland
Environment: Coastal wetlands are highly effective carbon sinks - "Blue carbon" slows down the global greenhouse effect
Aquaculture: FIAP sells a wide range of equipment for the aquaculture industry - A one-stop shop for fish farmers
Trade and Markets: Web portal offers information on aquaculture producers
Guest pages: Luisa Alvarez Blanco, FEDEPESCA - Giving traditional fish retailers a voice

 

Published in Magazine Issues

This article featured in Eurofish Magazine 6 2018.

EM6 18 AQ Global Fishery Forum 2018St. Petersburg, the “Venice of the North”, hosted the second edition of the Global Fishery Forum and Seafood Expo Russia on 13-15 September 2018. The event centered on what to expect from the global fisheries industry and markets in the coming decades.
The forum brought together more than 1 100 business leaders, members of international food and fisheries organizations, specialized ministries, international seafood companies and fisheries representatives from 42 countries, including Canada, China, Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Morocco, Norway, and Turkey.

 

Asia strongly represented at aquaculture session

The session “Aquaculture production and development forecast by 2050” focused on the discussions of the state of the global aquaculture sector, its future growth, and environmental control and safety. Moderated by Ekaterina Tribilustova, Eurofish International Organisation, the session hosted experts from specialized agencies, ministries, sectorial organisations and unions from 8 countries, including the Federal Agency for Fisheries of Russia, the Union of Sturgeon Breeders of Russia, China’s Union of Seafood Processing Enterprises, Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry of Turkey, the Ministry of Agricultural Development of Islamic Republic of Iran and Shilat Organization for Fisheries and Fish Farming of Iran, and the National Institute of Research and Development of fisheries sector in the Republic of Korea.
At present, the aquaculture industry produces over 45% of fish and seafood products consumed globally, while the share of fish products is 53%, according to the FAO. At the same time, the global population has never consumed as much fish as now. Since 1961, the growth rates of fish consumption in the world have been two times higher than the population growth, while the production growth rates have been declining. It is expected that even growing at a slower rate the aquaculture sector can eliminate the gap between growing demand and declining resources playing a major role in providing the world population with the proteins they need. The aquaculture sector in particular has an especially important role in improving food nutrition and fighting hunger.

Published in Aquaculture

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Between 13-14 November 2018, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and International Organization for the Development of Fisheries and Aquaculture in Europe (EUROFISH), in cooperation with the European Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture Advisory Commission (EIFAAC), the Romanian Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, the Romanian Ministry of Waters and Forests, the Danube Sturgeon Task Force and the International Association for Danube Research, organize in Bucharest a Regional Conference on river habitat restoration in the Danube Basin and Black Sea area.

The aim of this conference is to contribute to the revival of fish populations, inland and recreational fisheries, food security, and livelihoods of riparian communities. A particular focus will be placed on sturgeons as the flagship species of the Danube River Basin, long distance migratory species currently under recovery, but who still require special protection measures against illegal fishery. To support sturgeon recovery in the Danube River, Romania, through the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and the Ministry of Environment, Waters and Forests, restricted the commercial fishery of these valuable species since 2006 for a period of 15 years. The conservation of Danube sturgeons is supported by the European Commission, the EU Strategy for the Danube Region and numerous Danube stakeholders implementing the program Sturgeon 2020.

This conference marks the beginning of a closer dialogue between the environmental and fishery/aquaculture authorities from the Danube countries, aiming to reduce the current decline of freshwater fish species and identify constructive solutions for the revival of endangered species and fish populations with high economic value, bringing benefits to the riverine communities along the Danube River. With this occasion, besides discussing urgent measures that need to be implemented, successful examples and good practices applied in other European states will be presented to foster their adaptation at regional level.

Fishery and aquaculture provide valuable food and income resources for approximately 820 million people worldwide, starting with recreational and commercial fishery, and ending with processing, marketing and distribution of different fish products. For many communities, they represent part of the local tradition and cultural identity.

For more information visit danube-conference.eurofish.dk.

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